From the Lady Cave: Cancer (3 yr Check Up Day)

About 3 years ago I was diagnosed with Kidney Cancer; but so where many others and a few people close to me.

One minute you’re in that “that won’t happen to me” or “that happens to Older people” club. But what happens next once you are diagnosed? I am here to tell you there’s a lot of guess work; educated guesses but staying positive is crucial!

They never know really what causes cancer to grow but they can tell you stress will feed it. I know stress comes in all forms and sometimes you don’t even know that you are stressed. But your body is a mysterious and knowing thing. We can ignore the aches and pains or we can run to the doctor at the first implication of anything that could be wrong.

Sometimes we get so inundated with information that you are sure you’ve got whatever it is…This is Stress!

In my Opinion, I recommend Educating yourself; admit that anything is a possibility. But first, be rational and positive!

So I was diagnosed and had surgery in about a 6 week period and this type of cancer cannot be treated with Chemo or Radiation. What!? I know isn’t that weird?

Doesn’t everyone who has cancer need one or both of these to treat it? Nope, now ask me how that feels?

I was relieved at first, luckily I didn’t lose my kidney (it was 1mm away) but they took a nice hunk out of it. Today I am fine and incredibly thankful and humble for everyone involved in the whole scenario.

But there are other people in my life that weren’t as lucky as me; and I feel guilty. Now here me out before you say “don’t be”.

Please make no mistake; I am not looking for sympathy or attention by telling you this. I want you to know that these people matter to me and their families. Many people really don’t talk about their ordeal. Many fade into the background. Many just don’t want people to hover or make them feel like they are dying. Because let’s get real here, the first reaction by most people is the “aw damn so sorry for your lose” look and statement. The person is still alive and has hopes and dreams of coming through this with at least some scars, but still alive.

Me, I refused to give into the negative thought that this was the end; this was a part of my journey. My mantra was “You can’t sweat the stuff you have no control over”!

This is not a unique thought. I saw a man who was given 6 months to a year to live and made it over 18 months and those were the most memorable months a family could ask for.

I saw a woman endure her whole ordeal in almost complete silence. I watched a woman come to grips with her next chapter in the universe.

It is all heart breaking but what hurts me here is people really aren’t talking about any of it. I know it’s a really tough conversation because it is such an emotional subject. But we need to share our experience to help educate others; other caregivers, other cancer patients, other doctors, see the ripple effect here?

Every one of us thinks it’s just happening to us, no one is going through what we are going through and if, you want to split hairs that is true.

But what about the people that are going through it with you like your caregiver or family? They are watching you and for the most part taking the lead from you. No one wants to be a burden. To be a burden implies the stress of thinking you are not worthy. Let me ask you, would you take care of someone if they were in your place?

I think some people would say they would rather take care of someone else. But think about this, could your experience help someone else in the future? Could your knowledge of your experience help you help someone else? I think the possibilities are endless a “ripple effect” if you will.

I am a big proponent of “what you put out in the universe will come back to you”.

So staying as positive as possible is a must but you have to take the step and put it out there.